New York Times Nonfiction Bestsellers

Week of January 11th (list limited to titles available at the library)

view fiction »

1.

Educated

by Tara Westover

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.
2.

Talking To Strangers

by Malcolm Gladwell

Famous examples of miscommunication serve as the backdrop to explain potential conflicts and misunderstandings.
3.

Becoming

by Michelle Obama

The former first lady describes how she balanced work, family and her husband’s political ascent.
4.

Maybe You Should Talk To Someone

by Lori Gottlieb

A psychotherapist gains unexpected insights when she becomes another therapist’s patient.
5.

Me

by Elton John

The multi-award-winning solo artist's first autobiography chronicles his career, relationships and private struggles.
6.

Catch And Kill

by Ronan Farrow

The Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter details some surveillance and intimidation tactics used to pressure journalists and elude consequences by certain wealthy and connected men.
7.

Boys and Sex

by Peggy Orenstein

How young men comprehend cultural forces and navigate sexual and emotional relationships.
8.

Range

by David Epstein

An argument for how generalists excel more than specialists, especially in complex and unpredictable fields.
9.

The Body

by Bill Bryson

An owner’s manual of the human body covering various parts, functions and what happens when things go wrong.
10.

Successful Aging

by Daniel J Levitin

A neuroscientist suggests using resilience strategies as we grow older.
11.

Sam Houston And The Alamo Avengers

by Brian Kilmeade

The "Fox & Friends” host gives an account of the battle against the Mexican Army in 1836.
12.

Say Nothing

by Patrick Radden Keefe

A look at the conflict in Northern Ireland known as the Troubles.
14.

How To Be An Antiracist

by Ibram X Kendi

A primer for creating a more just and equitable society through identifying and opposing racism.
15.

Blowout

by Rachel Maddow

The MSNBC host argues that the global oil and gas industry has weakened democracies and bolstered authoritarians.